Part 1 of the GPDO – Larger Rear Extensions – Background Information

This page provides highly detailed background information for the system of larger rear extensions under Part 1 Class A of the GPDO (i.e. from 30/05/2013 to 30/05/2019):

CHRONOLOGY:

5-6 September 2012: (Government announces the proposals)

  • On 05/09/2012 and 06/09/2012 the government announced its proposals to allow larger single storey rear extensions for a temporary period of 3 years.
  • For a terrace or semi-detached house the 3m limit would be increased to 6m, and for a detached house the 4m limit would be increased to 8m. These changes would not apply within a conservation area, AONB, National Park, etc.
  • Link to BBC News article: (link).
  • Link to statement by Eric Pickles: (link).

12 November 2012 to 24 December 2012: (6-week public consultation)

  • From 12/11/2012 to 24/12/2012 the government undertook a public consultation, for which the consultation document was titled "Extending permitted development rights for homeowners and businesses - Technical consultation".
  • Link to public consultation document: (pdf) (link).

20 December 2012: (Communities and Local Government Committee publishes its report)

  • On 20/12/2012 the Communities and Local Government Committee (a Commons Select Committee) published its report, which was highly critical of the proposals.
  • The report concluded that the government should not continue with the changes, and instead should start again by completing "a comprehensive assessment of the social, environmental and economic impact" followed by "a fresh and extensive consultation".
  • Link to committee's report: (pdf) (link).

26 March 2013: (Growth and Infrastructure Bill, House of Lords)

  • Although the Growth and Infrastructure Bill did not initially cover the proposed changes to Part 1 of the GPDO, on 26/03/2013 the House of Lords decided to amend the Bill by inserting a new clause that would amend the TCPA 1990 to allow local authorities to opt-out of any development order made after 01/01/2013 that grants planning permission for development within the curtilage of a dwellinghouse.
  • This amendment (which was subsequently removed) would have meant that any future changes to Part 1 of the GPDO would not apply within the jurisdiction of any local authority that has "resolved" that the changes shall not apply.
  • Link to transcript: (link).

16 April 2013: (Growth and Infrastructure Bill, House of Commons)

  • On 16/04/2013 the House of Commons decided to disagree with the above amendment to the Growth and Infrastructure Bill by the House of Lords, following assurances made by Eric Pickles (Secretary of State, Department for Communities and Local Government) during the debate that the proposed changes to Part 1 of the GPDO would be "revised".
  • Link to transcript: (link).

19 April 2013: (Letter from Eric Pickles to MPs)

  • On 19/04/2013 Eric Pickles (Secretary of State, Department for Communities and Local Government) wrote a letter to MPs setting out the revised version of the proposed changes to Part 1 of the GPDO.
  • According to this letter:
    "- Homeowners wishing to build extensions under the new powers would notify their local council with the details.
    - The council would then inform the adjoining neighbours – this already happens for planning applications.
    - If no objections are made to the council by the neighbours within a set period, the development can proceed.
    - If objections are raised by neighbours, the council will consider whether the development would have an unacceptable impact on neighbours’ amenity.
    - This is a form of ‘prior approval’ process which allows for consideration by ward councillors, and (if the council wishes) by a Planning Committee.
    - There will be no fee for householders to go through this process".
  • Link to letter: (pdf) (link).

22 April 2013: (Growth and Infrastructure Bill, House of Lords)

  • On 22/04/2013 the House of Lords decided to remove their previous amendment to the Growth and Infrastructure Bill, and to accept a replacement amendment proposed by Baroness Hanham (Parliamentary Under Secretary of State, Department for Communities and Local Government).
  • This replacement amendment to the Bill would insert a new clause that would amend the TCPA 1990 to allow Part 1 of the GPDO to include circumstances in which the owner would need to notify the local authority (i.e. the notification and prior approval process).
  • The amendment specifies that the submitted information would need to include "a written description, and a plan, of the proposed development", that the local authority would serve notice "on the owner or occupier of any adjoining premises", and that if one of these owners or occupiers objects then the planning permission granted by the GPDO will apply "only if the local planning authority consider that it would not have an unacceptable impact on the amenity of adjoining premises".
  • Link to transcript: (link).

23 April 2013: (Growth and Infrastructure Bill, House of Commons)

  • On 23/04/2013 the House of Commons decided to agree with the above amendment to the Growth and Infrastructure Bill by the House of Lords
  • This means that the proposals to allow Part 1 of the GPDO to include circumstances in which the owner would need to notify the local authority (i.e. the notification and prior approval process) have now been agreed by both Houses.
  • During the debate, Michael Fallon (Minister of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills) confirmed the following about the proposals:
    - "A home owner wishing to build an extension will write to the local planning authority providing plans and a written description of the proposal. The local authority will then notify the adjoining neighbours—for example, the owners or occupiers of properties that share a boundary, including those at the rear. Those neighbours will have 21 days in which to make an objection, the same period as under existing planning rules. If no neighbours object, the home owner will be able to proceed. If any neighbour raises an objection, the local authority will then consider whether the impact of the proposed extension on the amenity of neighbours is acceptable".
    - "No planning fee will be levied on the home owner making the notification".
    - "If approval is not given, the home owner will be able to appeal against a refusal, or may wish to submit a full planning application. As with normal planning consents, neighbours will not be able to appeal against a grant of permission".
    - "I can confirm that this does not apply to conservation areas, and that the ability of a local authority to use an article 4 direction is not impaired by the changes we are making."
    - "I can confirm that [existing permitted development rights are not in any way affected by this new procedure]".
  • Link to transcript: (link).

25 April 2013: (Growth and Infrastructure Bill, Royal Assent)

  • On 25/04/2013 the Growth and Infrastructure Bill was granted Royal Assent, and became the "Growth and Infrastructure Act 2013".
  • Link to Act: (link).
  • Link to government press release: (link).

9 May 2013: (Government publishes Statutory Instrument 2013 No. 1101)

  • On 09/05/2013 the government published Statutory Instrument 2013 No. 1101, which is titled "The Town and Country Planning (General Permitted Development) (Amendment) (England) Order 2013".
  • This SI came into force on 30/05/2013, and amended Part 1 Class A to allow (subject to prior approval) certain houses to erect larger single storey rear extensions during the 3 year period from 30/05/2013 to 30/05/2016. For such houses, the rear projection limits (for a single storey extension) have been increased from 3m to 6m (attached houses) and from 4m to 8m (detached houses).
  • These increased limits do not apply to the following:
    - Article 1(5) land (e.g. conservation area, AONB, National Park, the Broads, World Heritage Site, etc).
    - A Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI).
  • Before starting a larger rear extension, the developer must successfully complete the notification and prior approval process. The developer must notify the local authority by providing the following information:
    "- a) a written description of the proposed development including—
    ---(i) how far the enlarged part of the dwellinghouse extends beyond the rear wall of the original dwellinghouse;
    ---(ii) the maximum height of the enlarged part of the dwellinghouse; and
    ---(iii) the height of the eaves of the enlarged part of the dwellinghouse;
    -
    (b) a plan indicating the site and showing the proposed development;
    - (c) the addresses of any adjoining premises;
    - (d) the developer’s contact address; and
    - (e) the developer’s email address if the developer is content to receive communications electronically."
  • After receiving such a notification, the local authority must consult the adjoining premises, with a minimum consultation period of 21 days. The legislation sets out specific requirements as to the information that must be provided by the consultation letter, including a description of the length, maximum height, and eaves height of the extension.
  • If any of the owners or occupiers of the adjoining premises object to the proposed development, then "the prior approval of the local planning authority is required as to the impact of the proposed development on the amenity of any adjoining premises". To assess this impact, the local authority "may require the developer to submit such further information regarding the proposed development as the local planning authority may reasonably require in order to consider the impact of the proposed development on the amenity of any adjoining premises". When assessing this impact, the local authority needs to:
    "- (a) take into account any representations made as a result of the [consultation process]; and
    - (b) consider the amenity of all adjoining premises, not just adjoining premises which are the subject of representations."
  • The legislation states that the development shall not be begun before the occurrence of one of the following:
    "- (a) the receipt by the developer from the local planning authority of a written notice that their prior approval is not required;
    -
    (b) the receipt by the developer from the local planning authority of a written notice giving their prior approval;
    - (c) the expiry of 42 days following the date on which the information [required for the notification] was received by the local planning authority without the local planning authority notifying the developer as to whether prior approval is given or refused."
  • The legislation requires that a larger rear extension "shall be completed on or before 30th May 2016". Note: This requirement was subsequently amended on 15/04/2015 to change this date to 30/05/2019 - for further information, please view the entry below dated "March 2015".
  • The legislation also requires that "the developer shall notify the local planning authority of the completion of the development as soon as reasonably practicable after completion" and states that this notification shall include:
    "- (a) the name of the developer;
    - (b) the address or location of the development, and
    - (c) the date of completion".
  • Note: For an extension that's not a larger rear extension, the system remains the same as before. For example, if a developer wants to erect a 3m rear extension on an attached house or a 4m rear extension on a detached house, then they can still simply undertake the works without involving the local authority, or they can choose to submit an optional application for an LDC.
  • Link to Statutory Instrument 2013 No. 1101: (pdf) (link).
  • Link to government press release: (link).
  • For further information about this SI, please view this post.

9 May 2013: (Government publishes draft guidance document)

  • On 09/05/2013 DCLG published a draft guidance document titled "Larger Home Extensions - Neighbour Consultation Scheme".
  • This draft guidance document reiterates the procedures set out by the above Statutory Instrument 2013 No. 1101, and also provides the following additional information:
    - "The Householder Permitted Development: Technical Guidance will be fully updated once the secondary legislation has been approved by Parliament and has come into force".
    - "There is no fee in connection with this process [i.e. the process of notifing the local authority before starting works]".
    - "If approval is refused, the developer may appeal".
  • Link to "Larger Home Extensions - Neighbour Consultation Scheme" (May 2013): (pdf).
  • Link to "Larger Home Extensions - Neighbour Consultation Scheme" (Version 1.1) (June 2013): (pdf).
  • Link to "Larger Home Extensions - Neighbour Consultation Scheme" (Version 1.2) (June 2015): (pdf).

9 May 2013: (Government publishes its "Summary of Responses" to the public consultation)

  • On 09/05/2013 the government published its "Summary of Responses" to the public consultation that ran from 12/11/2012 to 24/12/2012.
  • The "Summary of Responses" document states that there were "1,178 responses received; 46% (547) were from individuals, 22% (254) from local authorities and 32% (377) from community and professional organisations and the voluntary sector".
  • With regards to Part 1 of the GPDO, the most relevant question within the public consultation was the following:
    - "Question 1: Do you agree that in non-protected areas the maximum depth for single-storey rear extensions should be increased to 8m for detached houses, and 6m for any other type of house?".
  • In relation to this question, the "Summary of Responses" document describes the response to the public consultation as follows:
    - "The majority of responses - 96% (1,136) - addressed this question. Of those, 15% (166) agreed with the proposal. These were mostly individuals: home owners who wish to use the new rights to improve their homes, in some cases avoiding the need to move to a larger home to meet their accommodation needs; as well as building or professional firms who agreed that the changes could generate additional work with less bureaucracy."
    - "Those who did not agree with the proposals commented on:
    • potential impacts on neighbouring properties including blocking light and views, and the character of the area without neighbours having the opportunity to comment on or influence;
    • increasing the size of extensions would allow property owners to create larger houses in multiple occupation without obtaining planning permission;
    • other approvals, such as building regulations and water company consents, still being required;
    • the scope for having a smaller increase in the maximum depth of extensions or a set back from neighbouring boundaries."
  • In relation to this question, the "Summary of Responses" document describes the "Government's Response" as follows:
    - "The Government understands the importance of ensuring that any impact of the changes on neighbours’ amenity is acceptable. Therefore, in taking forward the proposed increases in size thresholds, there will be a new neighbours’ consultation scheme which will address comments raised. This will enable adjoining neighbours to raise an objection to the local planning authority where they believe their amenity is unacceptably affected. It will then be for the authority to consider whether or not the impact on the amenity of neighbours is acceptable."
    - "The existing safeguards under planning and other regimes will remain in place, and the changes do not remove or weaken requirements under the Party Wall Act, building regulations, the common law right to light or environmental legislation. Amendments to the Technical Guidance for Householder Permitted Development will both take account of the increased maximum depth for rear extensions and clarify the limitation that not more than 50% of the curtilage can be built on."
  • Link to government's "Summary of Responses" document: (pdf) (link).

30 May 2013: (Statutory Instrument 2013 No. 1101 comes into force)

  • This is the date that SI 2013 No. 1101 came into force - for further information about this SI, please view the first of the entries above dated "9 May 2013".

29 October 2013: (Government updates its "Technical Guidance" document):

  • On 29/10/2013 DCLG updated its "Technical Guidance" document to include a new section providing advice about larger rear extensions.
  • This new section reiterates the procedures set out by the above Statutory Instrument 2013 No. 1101, but does not provide any new information.
  • Link to 29/10/2013 version of the DCLG "Technical Guidance" document: (pdf).
  • Link to current version of the DCLG "Technical Guidance" document: (link).
  • For further information about this update, please view this post.

29 October 2013: (Government announces its intention to consolidate the GPDO)

  • On 29/10/2013 the government announced its intention to consolidated the GPDO. The press release stated that the changes will "consolidate the rules on permitted development which have been amended 17 times and need an overhaul to make them easier to understand".
  • Link to government press release: (link).

March 2014: (Government publishes Statutory Instrument 2014 No. 564)

  • In March 2014 the government published Statutory Instrument 2014 No. 564, which is titled "The Town and Country Planning (General Permitted Development) (Amendment and Consequential Provisions) (England) Order 2014".
  • This SI came into force on 06/04/2014, and amended Part 1 Class A to set out the following:
    - 1) The LPA can now refuse an application where, in the opinion of the LPA, a) the proposed development would not be permitted development, or b) the developer has provided insufficient information to establish that the proposed development would be permitted development. Note: The insertion of this additional option was a relatively significant amendment, because it effectively means that the LPA should now assess an application for prior approval against all of the limitations and conditions of Part 1 Class A, rather than against only paragraph A.4.
    - 2) If the LPA refuses the application for the above reasons, then there is no requirement to consult the adjoining premises or to assess the amenity impact.
    - 3) The LPA can now require the developer to submit further information to determine whether the proposed development would be permitted development.
    - 4) The LPA can now grant prior approval subject to conditions. Note: If the LPA grants prior approval subject to conditions, then the developer has the right to submit an appeal to the Planning Inspectorate.
  • In addition, this SI amended the Part 1 Classes (i.e. including Class A) so that they do not apply if permission to use the property as a dwellinghouse has been granted only by virtue of Part 3 Class IA or MB.
  • Link to Statutory Instrument 2014 No. 564: (pdf) (link).
  • For further information about this SI, please view this post.

6 April 2014: (Statutory Instrument 2014 No. 564 comes into force)

  • This is the date that SI 2014 No. 564 came into force - for further information about this SI, please view the entry above dated "March 2014".

31 July 2014 to 26 September 2014: (8-week public consultation)

  • From 31/07/2014 until 26/09/2014 the government undertook a public consultation, for which the consultation document was titled "Technical consultation on planning".
  • The above consultation document covered a wide range of planning proposals, including proposed changes to the GPDO and the Use Classes Order.
  • One of these proposed changes was to amend Part 1 Class A to remove the requirement for a larger rear extension to be completed on or before 30/05/2016 - i.e. so that the right to erect a larger rear extension (subject to prior approval) would operate on a permanent basis. As before, this right would not apply to a property on article 1(5) land, nor to a property on a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI).
  • Link to public consultation document: (pdf) (link).
  • For further information about this consultation, please view this post.

March 2015: (Government publishes Statutory Instrument 2015 No. 596)

  • In March 2015 the government published Statutory Instrument 2015 No. 596, which is titled "The Town and Country Planning (General Permitted Development) (England) Order 2015".
  • This SI came into force on 15/04/2015, and replaced the "GPDO 1995" with the "GPDO 2015". In doing so, it amended Part 1 Class A and article 4 of the GPDO to set out the following:
    - 1) The legislation now requires that any larger rear extension "must be completed on or before 30th May 2019" (note: the pre-15/04/2015 version of the legislation required that a larger rear extension "shall be completed on or before 30th May 2016").
    - 2) If a developer successfully completes the prior approval process for a larger rear extension, and then (before the developer starts works) the LPA makes an article 4 direction that removes PD rights under Part 1 Class A, the article 4 direction would not prevent the extension from being PD, albeit so long as the extension is completed within 3 years of the prior approval date.
    - 3) The legislation now requires the LPA to notify "each adjoining owner or occupier" (i.e. rather than "owners or occupiers of any adjoining premises").
    - 4) The legislation now confirms that the developer has the right to submit an appeal in the case where the LPA refuses the application under paragraph A.4(3).
    - 5) There have also a number of insignificant amendments, such as the replacement of the word "shall" with the word "must", the replacement of the phrase "shall not be begun" with the phrase "must not begin", etc.
  • In addition, this SI amended the Part 1 Classes (i.e. including Class A) so that they do not apply if permission to use the property as a dwellinghouse has been granted only by virtue of Part 3 Class M, N, P, or Q.
  • Link to Statutory Instrument 2015 No. 596: (pdf) (link).
  • For further information about this SI, please view this post.

15 April 2015: (Statutory Instrument 2015 No. 596 comes into force)

  • This is the date that SI 2015 No. 596 came into force - for further information about this SI, please view the entry above dated "March 2015".

March 2016: (Government publishes Statutory Instrument 2016 No. 332)

  • In March 2016 the government published Statutory Instrument 2016 No. 332, which is titled "The Town and Country Planning (General Permitted Development) (England) (Amendment) Order 2016".
  • This SI came into force on 06/04/2016, and amended the Part 1 Classes (i.e. including Class A) so that they do not apply if permission to use the property as a dwellinghouse has been granted only by virtue of Part 3 Class M, N, P, PA, or Q.

March 2016: (Planning Portal publishes guidance document)

  • In March 2016, the Planning Portal published a Guidance Note titled "Notification of a proposed larger Home Extension".
  • This Guidance Note appears to replace the previous DCLG draft guidance document (i.e. as referred to within the second of the entries above dated "9 May 2013").
  • Link to "Notification of a proposed larger Home Extension - Guidance Note" (Version 1) (March 2016): (pdf) (link).

13 April 2016: (Government updates its "Technical Guidance" document):

  • On 13/04/2016 DCLG updated its "Technical Guidance" document.
  • On various pages, references to "30 May 2016" (i.e. the deadline for larger rear extensions) have been replaced with references to "30 May 2019".
  • Link to April 2016 version of the DCLG "Technical Guidance" document: (pdf).
  • Link to current version of the DCLG "Technical Guidance" document: (link).
  • For further information about this update, please view this post.

6 April 2016: (Statutory Instrument 2016 No. 332 comes into force)

  • This is the date that SI 2016 No. 332 came into force - for further information about this SI, please view the first of the entries above dated "March 2016".

13 May 2016: (Government publishes its "response" to the public consultation)

  • On 13/05/2016 the government published its "response" to the public consultation that ran from 31/07/2014 until 26/09/2014.
  • The "response" document states that there were "943 responses", but doesn't provide a breakdown of the number of the number (of percentage) of responses that supported or opposed any of the new (or amended) PD rights.
  • UPDATE ON 31/07/2016: For information about a subsequent document that shows the percentage (and number) of responses that supported versus opposed each of the above proposals, please view this post.
  • With regards to Part 1 of the GPDO, the most relevant question within the public consultation was the following:
    - "Question 2.7: Do you agree that the permitted development rights allowing larger extensions for dwellinghouses should be made permanent?".
  • In relation to this question, the "response" document states that "There was some support among the responses to Question 2.7 for making permanent the permitted development right allowing larger extensions for dwellinghouses". However, the "response" document doesn't provide a breakdown of the number of the number (of percentage) of responses that supported or opposed this proposal.
  • In relation to this question, the "response" document describes the submitted comments as follows:
    - "There were a variety of opinions on this proposal, reflecting contrasting views on the existing temporary rights, which included:
    • that they were working well
    • householders welcomed the flexibility to adapt their home to reflect changing needs instead of having the upheaval of moving house
    • some extensions were large and poorly designed
    • it could change the mix of housing, with less smaller homes available for first time buyers or for those downsizing
    • local planning authorities had a limited opportunity to consider the impact on their area and immediate neighbours did not always object where a development could have an impact
    • the lack of planning fees resulted in the council funding the light touch prior approval application process
    • the deadline to complete the works should be retained, to incentivise development."
  • In relation to this question, the "response" document describes the "Government Response" as follows:
    - "The Government is of the view that this is a popular, beneficial measure for householders but notes that there are some concerns about its operation. It has extended the right for householders to build larger rear extensions, subject to a neighbour amenity test, for a further three years."
  • Link to government's "response" document: (pdf) (link).

March 2017: (Government publishes Statutory Instrument 2017 No. 391)

  • In March 2017 the government published Statutory Instrument 2017 No. 391, which is titled "The Town and Country Planning (General Permitted Development) (England) (Amendment) Order 2017".
  • This SI came into force on 06/04/2017, and amended Part 1 Class A to set out the following:
    - 1) In the case where the proposed extension would be joined to an existing extension, the "written description" provided by the developer must now include the measurements (i.e. length, maximum height, and eaves height) of "the total enlargement" (i.e. the combined structure).
    - 2) The "plan" provided by the developer (i.e. "indicating the site and showing the proposed development") must now also show "any existing enlargement of the original dwellinghouse to which the enlarged part will be joined".
    - 3) The "notice" served by the LPA must now describe the development "by setting out the information provided to the authority by the developer under paragraph A.4(2)(a)" (i.e. the information within the "written description").
  • Note: For information about the "Transitional and saving provisions" in relation to the pre-06/04/2017 version of Part 1 Class A, please view this post.

6 April 2017: (Statutory Instrument 2017 No. 391 comes into force)

  • This is the date that SI 2017 No. 391 came into force - for further information about this SI, please view the entry above dated "March 2017"

ILLUSTRATION PRODUCED BY PLANNING JUNGLE LIMITED:

This document illustrates the differences on terrace houses between 3m extensions (current limit) versus 6m extensions (proposed limit).

Example Screenshot for the above document:

This is an example screenshot for the above document, which illustrates the differences on terrace houses between 3m extensions (current limit) versus 6m extensions (proposed limit).

Statistics for the above document:

  • Last updated: December 2012 (regular updates not required)
  • Number of pages: 15

OTHER RESOURCES:

The passage of the Growth and Infrastructure Bill:

  • "Bill Stages" page showing the passage of the Growth and Infrastructure Bill through the House of Commons and the House of Lords (link).

House of Commons Library - Standard Notes:

  • "Permitted Development Rights" Standard Note (link).
  • "Planning Reform Proposals" Standard Note (link).

Communities and Local Government Committee (a Commons Select Committee):

  • Main page for the Communities and Local Government Committee, "Planning, housing and growth" inquiry (link).
  • 12/09/2012: Press release - Communities and Local Government Committee to take evidence from the new Ministers for Planning and Housing (link).
  • 15/10/2012: Press release - MPs hold oral evidence session for Planning, housing and growth inquiry (link).
  • 15/10/2012: Oral Evidence given to the Communities and Local Government Committee (pdf) (link to transcript) (link to video).
    (see Q87 to Q101 inclusive)
  • 06/11/2012: Written Evidence submitted to the Communities and Local Government Committee (pdf) (link).
  • 20/12/2012: Press release - MPs publish response to Government's consultation on permitted development rights for homeowners (link).
  • 20/12/2012: Report - The Committee's response to Government's consultation on permitted development rights for homeowners (pdf) (link).
  • 22/04/2013: Letter from the Chair of the Communities and Local Government Committee to Eric Pickles about the revised version of the proposed changes to Part 1 of the GPDO (pdf of letter) (link to letter) (link to press release).
  • 23/04/2013: Letter from Nick Boles to the Chair of the Communities and Local Government Committee about the revised version of the proposed changes to Part 1 of the GPDO (pdf) (link).

House of Commons - Initial Statement and Debate:

  • 06/09/2012: Statement by Eric Pickles (Secretary of State, Department for Communities and Local Government) on housing and growth (link).
  • 06/09/2012: House of Commons debate (link to transcript).
    (see columns 400 to 416 inclusive)

BBC News website - ALL articles:

  • 06/09/2012: BBC - Planning rules on extensions to be relaxed 'to boost economy' (link).
  • 06/09/2012: BBC - Planning rules set to be relaxed (link).
  • 06/09/2012: BBC - Q&A: Housing and planning shake-up (link).
  • 06/09/2012: BBC - Clegg: Planning changes will help economy grow (link).
  • 06/09/2012: BBC - Government plans are recipe for planning blight, says LGA (link).
  • 06/09/2012: BBC - Builders hope new rules will end 'planning chaos' (link).
  • 20/09/2012: BBC - Tory council set to defy relaxed planning rules (link).
  • 20/09/2012: BBC - Richmond council: Planning rules 'deeply unpopular' (link).
  • 20/09/2012: BBC - Richmond Council to oppose planning rules change (link).
  • 20/09/2012: BBC - Tory council set to defy relaxed planning rules (link).
  • 26/09/2012: BBC - Lib Dem activists want home extension proposals scrapped (link).
  • 11/10/2012: BBC - Councils urge ministers to U-turn over extensions plans (link).
  • 15/10/2012: BBC - Home extension deregulation plans 'may go on longer' (link).
  • 20/12/2012: BBC - Home extensions: MPs warn of confusion over relaxation plan (link).
  • 27/03/2013: BBC - Lords defeat 'won't change home extensions plan' (link).
  • 16/04/2013: BBC - Planning relaxation 'will bring neighbour disputes' (link).
  • 16/04/2013: BBC - Planning rules changes criticised by Conservative MP (link).
  • 16/04/2013: BBC - Eric Pickles promises a 'revised approach' to home extension plan (link).
  • 18/04/2013: BBC - Defeat possible on home extension plan, warns MP (link).
  • 19/04/2013: BBC - Eric Pickles amends home extension plans (link).
  • 22/04/2013: BBC - Peers back revised home extension plan (link).

Other News websites - INITIAL articles:

  • 06/09/2012: The Daily Mail - Planning rules and bureaucracy swept away so buildings can be extended without local authority permission (link).
  • 06/09/2012: The Daily Star - PM IN PLANNING PLEDGE OVER ECONOMY (link).
  • 06/09/2012: The Evening Standard - Planning laws to be streamlined to boost the economy (link).
  • 06/09/2012: The Express - PM IN PLANNING PLEDGE OVER ECONOMY (link).
  • 06/09/2012: The Guardian - David Cameron to unveil year-long relaxation of planning laws (link).
  • 06/09/2012: The Independent - David Cameron and Nick Clegg unveil plans to kick-start Britain's ailing house building industry (link).
  • 06/09/2012: The Mirror - It's the Conservatory party: David Cameron to let homeowners expand their houses by eight metres... without planning permission (link).
  • 06/09/2012: The Sun - Cameron’s ‘build what you like’ bonanza (link).
  • 05/09/2012: The Telegraph - David Cameron: build your way out of recession with home improvements (link).

Updates relating to this page:

Larger Rear Extensions - Guide:

Note: To view a detailed guide for the system of larger rear extensions, please view the Part 1 of the GPDO - Larger Rear Extensions - Guide page.